The OV-10 Bronco Association - OV-10Bronco.Net
A Non-Profit 501(c)3 Corporation – EIN 75-2774571

 
OV-10 Technical Data
Broncos Around the World (which is spinning backwards, I know...) OV-10 Bronco Broncos Around the World (which is spinning backwards, I know...)

  HOME         General Interest         OV-10 Bronco Association         Bronco Operators         Research & Info     
Overview
FAQ
Books
Videos
Stories
Links
Models:
  Overview
Flying
Static
Static - Before & After Project
Technical Data:
  Overview
OV-10A
OV-10B
OV-10C
OV-10D
OV-10E
OV-10F
T.O5 (Thailand)
VAL-4 OV-10A Tech Reports (USN) OV-10A Abbreviated Flight Checklists (USAF Version):
  Overview
Normal Flight
Emergency Procedures
 

There were several versions of the Bronco produced. All versions other than the D version were essentially slightly-modified versions of the original A model.
  • The YOV-10A was the first prototype Bronco used for development. (It was later used for testing different engines and now lives at the Yankee Air Museum in Michigan.)
  • The OV-10A was the original Bronco model, and the only model flown by the U.S. Air Force. Several foreign nations fly OV-10As as well.
  • The OV-10B was manufactured for West Germany as a target-tug aircraft. The OV-10B[Z] had a GE J-85-GE-4 turbojet engine rated at 2,950 lbst mounted above the wing on struts, above the centerline of the aircraft. This increased speed by 100mph, half the takeoff roll, and tripled the rate of climb although development problems led to this not seeing much use. The OV-10B was essentially an OV-10A with no weapons, no sponsons, and a glass greenhouse dome replacing the rear door, which was used by the tow operator. The rear seat was also removed. Six OV-10Bs and twelve OV-10B[Z]s were ordered, and served with Germany from 1970 until the early 1990s.
  • The OV-10C was supplied to Thailand (38 aircraft) for use in the COIN role.
  • The OV-10D was the most advanced version of the Bronco and was only used by the U.S. Marine Corps (refurbished D models were later used by some U.S. civilian operators, primarily NASA and the State Department.) The D model has a Forward-Looking Infrared (FLIR) night-vision system, with the main camera housed in a large turret underneath the nose, as well as much more powerful engines, composite propellers, flare and chaff dispensers in the rear booms, and other improvements. In Desert Shield / Desert Storm, OV-10Ds were preferred in combat due to their greater speed and capabilities while the OV-10As were restricted to operating mostly in daylight.
  • The OV-10E was supplied to Venezuela (16 aircraft.) These saw combat in 1993 by anti-government rebels in a coup attempt, resulting in the loss of three aircraft shot down by forces loyal to the government.
  • The OV-10F was supplied to Indonesia (12 aircraft) and have been used for fighting rebels in Timor.
  • The T.05 was a Thai attempt to replace the Bronco with a similar-looking but unrelated design. Contrary to previously-posted info, this seems to have had little (if anything) to do with the OV-10.

Bronco Versions General Tech Info
OV-10A
OV-10B
OV-10C
OV-10D
OV-10E
OV-10F
T.05 (Thailand)
Technical Home
VAL-4's Tech Reports
Flight Manuals

  • You can see some photos of B,C,E, and F-model Broncos on the Miscellaneous OV-10s page.
  • The OV-10 Technical Reports from VAL-4 are a must-read for anyone interested in the day-to-day operations of OV-10s!! (Adapted with permission, courtesy Bob Peetz of Blackpony.org)
  • Don't forget the USAF OV-10A Flight Checklists - these are the things the pilots used in the cockpit. Both normal and emergency procedures are covered, courtesy Brendan Searle.
  • U.S. Air Force Technical Order 1-1-4 defines how all service aircraft are to be marked, from camouflage patterns down to stencils and insignia, and everything in between. A 1994 version, which dates back some ways, covers all current aircraft at that time including the OV-10 (and some other neat planes like the F-106 and F-4.) The original was found at the WR-ALC/TILTA Tech Data Home Office site, which is VERY slow. Therefore, we've posted a local copy here. This is a large (5.5 MB) PDF file, but has a lot of great information.


Internal Details: Here are pictures of various Internal Details of OV-10s. Most of these pictures are also incorporated into other pages throughout this site.

(Coming soon - In progress!!!)


 
HOME    Welcome to OV-10Bronco.Net!!!
General
Interest

  OV-10 Bronco
Association

  Bronco
Operators

  Research
& Info

Hover over the arrows for the extended menu.
 

Click to learn how to join the OV-10 Bronco Association!

inetUSA Site developed and
hosted by inetUSA
Hits to this page since
May 15, 1998:
Counter